Tonga Photo

February 11, 2009

Politics

Filed under: Blogging, Culture, Guide, Nature, Photo, Photography, Photos, Pictures, Tonga, Travel, Trip, Vacation — tongaphoto @ 11:50 am
Tonga is the only monarchy in the Pacific (except monarchiami personnel remaining in the union with Great Britain), and the only one belonging to the British Commonwealth (except the United Kingdom). The kingdom is far greater than in Europe monarchiach, and respect for the king is as large as before stuleciami and is closely related to tongijską tradition.

The Head of State is the king, since 2006 it is Jerzy TUPOU V. King appoints the Prime Minister (now the Dr. is. Feleti Sevele) and ministers, often on a life term (in practice, ministers work until retirement age, which guarantees the stability and continuity of government ). As part of Tonga’s political system is also a parliament. But his democratic legitimacy is limited. Citizens can choose 9 of the 23 MPs. The rest are elected from among the members of prominent families and appointed by the king. In Tonga, political parties do not operate in the usual sense of the word, at the end of 80 years However, a civic opposition movement demanding a democratic country.

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December 10, 2008

Vava’u

Filed under: Blogging, Culture, Guide, Nature, Photo, Photography, Photos, Pictures, Tonga, Travel, Trip, Vacation — tongaphoto @ 6:23 pm

Vava’u is one of the three main archipelagos included in the Tonga in the Pacific Ocean. It consists of one large island and 40 smaller ones. Vava’u projects to 204 m above sea level. The capital of the island is Neiafu, the third largest town in Tonga. The main occupation of inhabitants is fishing. Vava’u is known for its beautiful beaches denatured.

October 13, 2008

More destinations

Filed under: Blogging, Culture, Guide, Nature, Photo, Photography, Photos, Pictures, Tonga, Travel, Trip, Vacation — tongaphoto @ 10:12 am
* The Ha’amonga is approximately 1000 Steintorplatz year-old in the northeast Tongatapus with Afa. Its significance as part of the royal palace or an astronomical observation station is uncertain.
* Pangaimotu, FAFA and Atata are tiny, the main island offshore islands with tourist resorts.
* ‘Eua, the “forgotten island” hosts the largest national park Tonga and many surprises for nature lovers.
* The remote islands Niuatoputapu and Niuafo’ou together with barely 2000 inhabitants were due to its remoteness (closer to Tonga than Samoa), even by most Tongan never visited.

August 24, 2008

Geography of Tonga

Filed under: Blogging, Culture, Guide, Nature, Photo, Photography, Photos, Pictures, Tonga, Travel, Trip, Vacation — tongaphoto @ 11:19 pm

Tonga is located in Oceania, an archipelago in the South Pacific Ocean, directly south of Western Samoa and about two-thirds of the way from Hawaii to New Zealand. Its 169 islands, 36 of them inhabited, are divided into three main groups–Vava’u, Ha’apai, and Tongatapu–and cover an 800-kilometer (500 mi.)-long north-south line. The largest island, Tongatapu, on which the capital city of Nuku’alofa is located, covers 257 square kilometers (99 sq. mi.). Geologically the Tongan islands are of two types: most have a limestone base formed from uplifted coral formations; others consist of limestone overlaying a volcanic base.

The climate is basically subtropical with a distinct warm period (December-April), during which the temperatures rise above 32 °C (90 °F), and a cooler period (May-November), with temperatures rarely rising above 27 °C (80 °F). The temperature increases from 23 °C to 27 °C (74 °F to 80 °F), and the annual rainfall is from 1,700 to 2,970 millimeters (67 to 117 in) as one moves from Tongatapu in the south to the more northerly islands closer to the Equator. The mean daily humidity is 80%.

June 21, 2008

Administrative divisions

Filed under: Blogging, Culture, Guide, Nature, Photo, Photography, Photos, Pictures, Tonga, Travel, Trip, Vacation — tongaphoto @ 1:00 pm

Tonga is divided into 3 administrative divisions: Ha’apai, Tongatapu and Vava’u. [3] Each has its own capital; the national capital, Nukuʻalofa, is also the capital of Tongatapu.

May 18, 2008

When to Go

Filed under: Blogging, Culture, Guide, Nature, Photo, Photography, Photos, Pictures, Tonga, Travel, Trip, Vacation — tongaphoto @ 11:43 am

The most comfortable time to visit the region is during the dry season between May and October. Not surprisingly, this is when most of the major festivals are held. It is also considered to be the region’s high season, though there isn’t necessarily much difference in costs.

The wet season (ostensibly its low season) lasts from November to April. March tends to be the wettest month, especially in Vava’u. Remember, though, that most precipitation occurs at night and the main discomfort will be caused by a rise in the lethargy-inducing heat and humidity. Tonga lies squarely within the South Pacific’s notorious cyclone belt. The season for tropical storms and cyclones is between November and March. Cyclones seem to occur, on average, every 10 to 15 years.

If you plan to come during the December-January holiday period, when huge numbers of Tongans return for the holidays (mostly from New Zealand, Australia and the USA), it’s wise to book flights well in advance.

May 7, 2008

Nukuʻalofa

Filed under: Blogging, Culture, Guide, Nature, Photo, Photography, Photos, Pictures, Tonga, Travel, Trip, Vacation — tongaphoto @ 1:06 pm

Nukuʻalofa, population 22,400 (1996), is the capital and largest city of Tonga. The city is located on the coast of Tongatapu island, located at 21°8′S 175°12′W / -21.133, -175.2Coordinates: 21°8′S 175°12′W / -21.133, -175.2 (-21.13333, -175.2).[1]

Nukuʻalofa is the most important commercial, transport and social centre of Tonga. It comprises about 35% of the Kingdom’s population. The Tonga Royal Palace is located there.

The Kingdom of Tonga

Filed under: Blogging, Culture, Guide, Nature, Photo, Photography, Photos, Pictures, Tonga, Travel, Trip, Vacation — tongaphoto @ 1:05 pm

The Kingdom of Tonga (Tongan for “south”) is an archipelago in the south Pacific Ocean comprising 169 islands, 96 of them inhabited, stretching over a distance of about 800 kilometres (500 miles) in a north-south line. The islands lie south of Samoa and are about a third of the way between New Zealand and Hawaii.

Tonga is the only surviving monarchy among the island nations of the Pacific Ocean, as well as being the only island nation never to have been formally colonized.

The islands are also known as the Friendly Islands because of the friendly reception accorded to Captain Cook on his first visit in 1773. He happened to arrive at the time of the ʻinasi festival, the yearly donation of the first fruits to the Tu’i Tonga, the islands’ paramount chief, and was invited to the festivities. According to the writer William Mariner, in reality the chiefs had wanted to kill Cook during the gathering, but had been unable to agree on a plan.

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